TD1 Minute: Perfect Standing Broad Jump Form | STACK
Kurt Hester
- Kurt Hester is the head strength and conditioning coach at Louisiana Tech. Prior to that, he served as D1’s director of training. In addition, he...

TD1 Minute: Standing Broad Jump

November 13, 2012

Coming Up

Kurt Hester, D1 Sports Training National Training Director and one of the driving forces behind The Dominant One Challenge, will be joining us periodically to give instructional tips on how to master your training and dominate your sport. For more information on the TD1 Challenge, visit their website at thedominant1.com.

The Standing Broad Jump is one of the most impressive tests at the NFL Combine. It's a true measure of lower-body power and an excellent indicator of overall athleticism. For skill positions, like running back, wide receiver and defensive back, this test is critical.

Like other Combine tests, the Standing Broad Jump may seem simple to the uninitiated; however, the correct technique that enables 10- or 11-foot jumps is quite complex. You have to use your upper body as well as your lower body to propel yourself up and out on each attempt.

Perfect your technique and maximize your Broad Jump distance with the six steps below. Also, check out the instructional video above for additional tips on this critical test.

Step 1

Place your feet shoulder-width (or slightly inside shoulder-width) apart. Many athletes start with their feet spread too wide. Point your toes straight down field. Make sure your feet are not staggered. If they are uneven, you will push off the dominant leg and land unevenly, shortening your jump.

Step 2

Stretch up with your arms and rise up onto the balls of your feet with your hips extended.

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Step 3

Bring your arms back behind you and bend your knees and hips. This rocking and stretching motion stores energy in your muscles, allowing for maximum power on the jump.

Step 4

Once you have performed steps two and three once or twice, you are ready to use that stored energy to explosive throw your body up and forward. Lower between a quarter and a half squat (no lower!) and drive as powerfully as possible off the ground while simultaneously throwing your arms forward as forcefully as possible.

Step 5

Once you are airborne, extend your hips up and out and throw your feet forward. This will add momentum to the jump, keeping you in the air longer.

Step 6

Land flatfooted with your weight slightly forward. You must stick the landing and not fall backward or forward, and your hands cannot touch the ground at any time after landing.

Check out previous episodes of the TD1 Minute to learn proper technique for the:

Kurt Hester
- Kurt Hester is the head strength and conditioning coach at Louisiana Tech. Prior to that, he served as D1’s director of training. In addition, he...

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