Strength Training With the Clean and Jerk: The Functional Way | STACK
X

Become a Better Athlete. Sign Up for our FREE Newsletter.

Strength Training With the Clean and Jerk: The Functional Way

December 11, 2012 | Jorge Bonnett

Must See Strength Training Videos

One of the most talked about lifts in the weight room for strength training also has a high risk for injury. That's the Clean and Jerk. It's a complex movement that requires precise attention to detail in order to do it right. The traditional Clean and Jerk is a sport all by itself!

Olympic weightlifting coaches estimate that it takes two months of consistent training just to learn to perform the lift correctly. So why do coaches love for their athletes to do such a complex movement? The answer is simple: to generate power off the ground...and they are right! My question to them is: Is there a better way to generate power off the ground without compromising the wrists, elbows, shoulders and lower back?

I believe there is a better way!

I have created the PurMotion Clean and Jerk attachment for use with an Olympic barbell, bumper plates and the Renegade (a.k.a. the Landmine, a.k.a. the ground rotational trainer). The handles of the Clean and Jerk attachment rotate, allowing you to maintain a neutral grip in which your joints are uncompromised throughout the full range of motion.

Hyperextension of the wrists is quite common while attempting to catch the bar on the clavicles. Not everyone is built such that the bar will rest on the clavicles. As a result, the wrists take the brunt of the weight in a highly compromised position. This hyperextension can be painful, and it does not contribute to generating power off the ground. A simple and safe device, the Clean and Jerk attachment is the converging point of traditional and functional strength training. It's something that coaches and players can relate to. Athletes do not need to master the technique of the Power Clean to reap the benefits. That was the dealmaker with my relationship with the University of Georgia. When their coaches saw the Clean and Jerk done the functional way, they really bought into it.

The key modified Clean and Jerk benefit is that athletes can develop more power off the ground efficiently and safely. The Clean and Jerk attachment can accommodate athletes of all sizes—even those with wide shoulders. The main difference between the traditional Clean and Jerk and the "PurMotion Clean and Jerk" is movement efficiency. The PurMotion version does not require the shoulders to roll forward to grasp the bar. This reduces the tendency to round the lower back. The chance of falling is reduced since one component of the motion is limited. There is also minimal chance of wrist hyperflexion on the catch. These key differences allow coaches to concentrate more on managing the load and/or the intensity of the lift instead of trying to prevent injuries.

Bottom line: we get more of what we want (power off the ground) and less of what we don't want (complication and injuries). Preventing injury keeps you on the field—performing at your best—by training the way you move and moving the way you play. That's the PurMotion way.

PurMotion Clean & Jerk Benefits

More Cool Stuff You'll Like

The Simplest Bodyweight Workout Ever

Bodyweight workouts are perfect for athletes that are stuck at home with no access to a weight room and little, or no, available equipment. Using only...

Don't Train Your Arms Until You Can Do These 4 Things

4 Sure-Fire Ways to Build a Strong Core

Never Bench Press With Your Feet in This Position

Build Full-Body Strength With 5 Suspension Trainer Exercises

3 Sandbag Training Mistakes Athletes Make

Master the Lateral Lunge to Improve Your Hockey Stride

Top 5 Baseball Strength Training Myths

A Better Way to Train Your Core

Reach New Training Heights With Resistance Band Exercises

Blast Through Plateaus with Tempo Sets

7 Ways to Work Out Competitively Without CrossFit

Kyle Lowry's 12-Week All-Star Training Program

Perfect Your Squat Technique With the Unloaded Squat

7-Exercise Core-Blasting Workout

7 Strategies for Faster Workout Recovery

Bench Press Grip Guide: How Hand Placement Changes the Exercise

How NOT to Perform a Pull-Up (With Fixes)

Break Through Plateaus With the 1-10 Drop Set Method

4 Exercises to Build True Lacrosse Power

4 Weaknesses That Can Ruin Your Exercise Technique (With Fixes)

Get Faster by Improving Your Core Mobility

Dominate Your Bench Test With This Strategy

7 Best Lower-Body Strengthening Exercises

3 Post-Activation Potentiation Combos for Explosive Strength

4 Lifts to Build Wrestling Strength

The Best Single-Leg Exercises for Youth Athletes

How to Design a Greco-Roman Wrestling Training Program

Make Lifts More Challenging With Resistance Bands

The Science of Building Muscle: 2 Ways to Maximize Hypertrophy

How Functional Training Has Overly Complicated Strength Training

5 Isolation Exercises Your Workout Is Missing

Mike Boyle's 5 Tips for More Effective Workouts

7 Exercises That Safely Build Shoulder Strength

10 Ways to Get Stronger With a Sandbag

Notice On-Court Results With This Basketball Core Workout

Improve Soccer Agility with Lateral Strength Exercises

These 3 Single-Leg Movements Will Improve Your Squat Technique

3 Explosive Exercises Designed to Increase Pitching Power

How Often Should You Vary Your Exercise?

5 Softball Catcher Drills for Throwing Power

Develop Core Strength for Throwing

3 Nordic Hamstring Curl Exercises to Boost Your Performance

4 Deadlift Variations to Increase Your Pull