Basketball Guru Kevin Eastman On How Coaching From the Stands Ruins One of Sports' Key Life Skills

Eastman spent 12 years as the national director of Nike's skill development programs and was an assistant coach for the Boston Celtics for 8 seasons.

Kevin Eastman knows basketball. He was an assistant coach for the Boston Celtics for eight seasons, including their 2008 championship run. After that, he was the Los Angeles Clippers' Vice-President for Basketball Operations for two seasons. Eastman also spent 12 years as the national director of Nike's skill development programs for elite high school and college players.

In the above video, Eastman explains the hazard of parents coaching their kids from the stands. He also shares an exercise he's utilized to help get his point across to both parents and players. Ultimately, Eastman shares the perspective that it's not just about the player's performance, but it's also about equipping them with the life skills they need to be successful in any endeavor.

"Athletes play for coaches, just like people work for bosses in the real world. It is essential to communicate through coaches and bosses rather than a third party (and that's something athletes can learn through sports)," Eastman says.

To find this full resource and over 2,000 others from Positive Coaching Alliance, head over to pcadevzone.org.

Positive Coaching Alliance is dedicated to building Better Athletes, Better People and is a proud contributor to STACK.

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Topics: COACH | YOUTH SPORTS | BASKETBALL COACH | POSITIVE COACHING | POSITIVE COACHING ALLIANCE