Powerade Removes Controversial Ingredient

Powerade has removed a controversial ingredient from two of its sports drinks.

Coca-Cola is removing a controversial ingredient from its Powerade sports beverage following a similar move by Pepsi's Gatorade last year.

The ingredient, brominated vegetable oil, was the target of a change.org petition started by Mississippi teenager Sarah Kavanagh, who noted the ingredient was not approved for use in Japan or the European Union, and that it was also used as a flame retardant.

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According to an Associated Press report, bottles of fruit punch and strawberry lemonade Powerade have arrived in the Detroit, Omaha, New York and Washington, D.C. areas without brominated vegetable oil on the ingredients list. However, some bottles still list the ingredient, which suggests that Coca-Cola may be phasing it out.

Bromine is used to keep flavors from separating and floating to the top in a beverage like Powerade, according to an article by Dr. Joseph Mercola.

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Coca-Cola's decision to remove brominated vegetable oil comes on the heels of a petition from food blogger Vani Hari to remove azodicarbonamide from Subway bread. It appears that consumers are becoming more interested in simple, easy to understand ingredients—and neither azodicarbonamide nor brominated vegetable oils have a place much longer.


Photo Credit: Getty Images // Thinkstock

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