The 7 Best Slide Board Exercises

Perform these slide board exercises from STACK Expert Rich Sadiv to add variety and challenge to your workouts.


The slide board is great for adding variety and a new degree of challenge to your workouts.

To get you going, here are seven of my favorite slide board exercises. These movements focus on the quadriceps, hamstrings, adductors, core stabilizers and shoulders. The exercises will also test your balance and coordination, and improve unilateral weaknesses. Check out the video player above to see Dwyane Wade's killer Slide Board routine.

If you don't have a slide board, you can use gliding discs just as effectively. You can regress or progress each of the movements by adjusting the time of the set or adding dumbbells to the Lunges.

I've rated each exercise from 1 (easiest) to 3 (hardest).

RELATED: Why Hockey Players Should Train on a Slideboard

Slide Board Exercises

1. Speed Skaters

This is the exercise that's most slide board-specific. It's also one of the more challenging of the bunch, and the only one you can't do with gliding discs. It takes some practice, but the effort is worth it.

How-To:

  • Start at one end of the slide board with your shoulders perpendicular to the board. Your left leg should be straight, and your right foot should be off the board and behind your left leg. Your right shin should be parallel to the ground, left arm straight back and right arm at 90 degrees with the thumb at chin height. 
  • With a very aggressive arm action, switch your arms and extend your right leg out to your right side. 
  • Once you hit the end of the board, reverse the movement.

If you aren't a hockey player or an Olympic speed skater, chances are you won't go too far on the first few attempts. But with a dynamic arm action and extension of the lead leg, you will be covering the length of the board in no time.

Sets/Reps: Start with 5x3 each side, then work up to a minute of timed sets with a three-minute rest. Difficult rating: 3.

2. Single-Leg Mountain Climbers

This is a great dynamic exercise that will challenge your lower body, core and shoulders.

How-to:

  • Start in a push-up position with your hands off the board and your feet on it. 
  • Line up your body in the same direction as the board. 
  • Bring one leg forward in a dynamic fashion until your knee goes past the edge of the board. 
  • Alternate your legs as fast as possible. Keep your core tight and your knees inside your elbows.

Sets/Reps: Start with timed sets of 15 seconds. Work up to 3 sets of 30 seconds with 60 seconds off between sets. Difficulty rating: 2.

3. Double-Leg Mountain Climbers

The two-leg variation also increases your core strength and adds a conditioning element.

How to:

  • Set up the same as the Single-Leg Mountain Climber, but instead of alternating right leg with left leg, drive up both knees simultaneously. 
  • Keep your core as tight as possible as you drive both knees forward and back.

Sets/Reps: Start with timed sets of 15 seconds. Work up to 3 sets of 30 seconds with 60 seconds off between sets. Difficulty rating: 2.

Progression: Do 3 sets of the Single-Leg followed by 3 sets of the Double-Leg.

4. Double-Leg Pike

One of the best exercises you can perform to increase your core strength.

How to:

  • Start in a push-up position with your feet together. 
  • Keeping your legs as straight as possible, raise your hips up. Your goal is to get your feet as close to flat as possible while keeping your knees locked. 
  • Reverse the movement slowly to the starting position.

Sets/Reps: Start with sets of 5 and progress to sets of 10. Your knees will tend to bend to generate momentum. Focus on driving your hips up. Difficulty rating: 3.

5. Forward Lunge

Helps with deceleration and quad strength.

How to:

  • Start with your left foot off the board and your right foot on. 
  • As your right foot slides across the board in a lunging manner, bring your left hand up and your right hand back. Your arms should be at 90 degrees with the forward hand moving to chin height and the back hand going past the hip. 
  • Do 5 reps, then change to the left leg. 
  • To progress the movement, hold a set of dumbbells at your sides with no arm action.

Sets/Reps: Use your body weight for 5 reps per leg. Move up to 10 reps per leg, then add resistance by holding a set of dumbbells. Difficulty rating: 1.

RELATED: Steve Cishek Plate-Loaded Slideboard Lunges

6. Reverse Lunge

Builds glute and quad strength, teaching your lower-body muscles to drive off the ground. The Reverse Lunge follows the same movement patterns as the Front Lunge except the lead leg lunges backward.

How to:

  • Stand at one end of the board facing away from the board. 
  • Place your left foot off the board and your right foot on it. 
  • As your right foot slides across the board in a lunging manner, bring your left hand up and your right hand back. Your arms should be at 90 degrees with your forward hand moving to chin height and your back hand going past your hip. 
  • Do 5 reps, then change to your left leg. To progress the movement, hold a set of dumbbells at your sides with no arm action.

Sets/Reps: Use your body weight for 5 reps per leg. Move up to 10 reps per leg, then add resistance by holding a set of dumbbells. Difficulty rating: 1.

7. Side Lunge

Trains your body laterally, preparing you for multi-directional movements.

How to:

  • Stand at one end of the slide board with your right shoulder perpendicular to the board. Your left foot should be off the board and your right foot on it. 
  • Slide your right foot down the board as you bend your left knee. 
  • Keep your head in the center of your body.

The arm action follows the same principals as the Lunges: opposite arm of lead leg comes forward at 90 degrees; opposite hand to back pocket. The leg that is off the board is considered your lead leg. Your personal flexibility will dictate how far the slide leg travels.

Sets/Reps: Start with 5 reps per leg with no resistance. Progress by holding a plate or medicine ball with both arms straight out at arms' length. Difficulty rating: 3.

You can do all 3 Lunges as a lower-body workout. Do 4 sets of each movement.

RELATED: Elite Performance With Mike Boyle: The Best Single-Leg Exercise


Photo Credit: Getty Images // Thinkstock

Topics: EXERCISE | DUMBBELLS | SLIDE BOARD