How to Tailor Clothes for a Workout

You'd look pretty silly showing up for football practice in spandex. Check out the properties of some popular fabrics used in the design and manufacture of athletic apparel.

Dwight Howard in moisture-wicking clothes

Whether you're lifting at the gym, out on a run or practicing yoga, rarely do you see anyone in just sweats and a t-shirt.

Athletic apparel is a big business with big marketing budgets. We often associate brands of athletic clothing with the stars who wear them, but it should take more than a Puma catsuit (Serena Willams' former brand) for a true athlete to make a purchase.

Brands are now making clothing sport-specific to cater to the demands of different athletes. Gymnasts don't practice in the same garb that basketball or football players wear.

An example of a brand that has focused on a specific sport is Athletic DNA. Created by two college tennis players, the clothing is designed to freely accommodate the motions tennis players go through on the court.

Nike's Dri-Fit gear wicks moisture away from the skin, making it ideal for hard, sweaty workouts. (See Hot Clothes that Keep You Cool.)

Lycra is another material popular for athletic clothing. It is stretchy yet allows the athlete to breathe. Compression shorts are often made from Lycra, and it's a great material for cycling shorts.

Different styles, sizes, and cuts can be found from different brands. It's important to find something that you feel comfortable in and will allow you to move freely for your sport.

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Photo Credit: Getty Images // Thinkstock

Topics: FOOTBALL | BASKETBALL TRAINING | TENNIS | CYCLING | SHORTS | COMPRESSION | CLOTHES | APPAREL | FOOTBALL PLAYERS | COLLEGE TENNIS | COMPRESSION SHORTS