Don't Cheat Yourself: Prepare Properly for the SAT and ACT

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During the season, competitive athletes basically live, eat and breathe their sport. They practice nearly every day, study up on their opponents, lift weights and eat right to maximize their natural ability. In the off-season, they attend camps and often seek out personal trainers to capitalize on their athletic ability so they can start the next season at the top of their game. Yet, many of these same athletes are content to meet with an ACT or SAT test tutor only once a week, thinking it will provide them with all the tools necessary to post great scores.

Dieters don't diet once a week, medical residents don't study once a week, and marathon runners don't run once a week. So why is it acceptable for student-athletes seeking to play collegiate sports to prepare for the most important test of their lives just once a week?

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ACT SAT Test Prep

During the season, competitive athletes basically live, eat and breathe their sport. They practice nearly every day, study up on their opponents, lift weights and eat right to maximize their natural ability. In the off-season, they attend camps and often seek out personal trainers to capitalize on their athletic ability so they can start the next season at the top of their game. Yet, many of these same athletes are content to meet with an ACT or SAT test tutor only once a week, thinking it will provide them with all the tools necessary to post great scores.

Dieters don't diet once a week, medical residents don't study once a week, and marathon runners don't run once a week. So why is it acceptable for student-athletes seeking to play collegiate sports to prepare for the most important test of their lives just once a week?

At THR College Planning, we have heard the excuse "I am not a good test taker" too many times to count. Such statements are often  confirmed by the parents, attesting that, "Yes, my child is not a good test taker." Our response usually goes something like this: "No, your child is a fine test taker, but he/she is bad at preparing for tests!" After making this statement, we usually get looks of confusion and surprise. Parents are in a state of disbelief at first, but then the wheels begin to turn.

On the court or field, perfection is expected, and many athletes are the first to criticize their own performance if they don't play well. However, when it comes to preparing for standardized tests, these same people wait until the spring of their junior year—and even then, they rarely put forth the necessary effort. Students do the math worksheets just hours prior to their next session, or they simply glance over vocabulary words. They don't devote adequate vigor to this part of their lives—which is unfortunate, because academics are one of the most important aspects of the athletic recruiting process.

When student-athletes start meeting with an ACT or SAT tutor, both the student and his or her parents hope for a miracle worker—or perhaps just a miracle! Ironically, both parties would be livid if the student played for a coach who held practice once a week and came to that practice unprepared. Can you imagine how irate they would be if the team included only freshmen and walk-ons? Athletes would feel cheated. However, student-athletes cheat themselves every day with their nonchalant attitudes about properly preparing for standardized tests.

Students who prepare as thoroughly for the SAT and ACT as they do for their games are more likely to perform better on these exams. It sounds simple, yet it still seems an enigma to many young athletes. But it's not too late; learn how you can improve your study habits.

Photo:  edisonohio.edu

THR College Planning is one of the nation's premier recruiting and placement programs. THR specializes in leveraging financial opportunities in the educational market. Academic development, financial aid assistance and athletic placement are keys to a successful THR plan. On average, THR has facilitated awards of $92,000 in scholarship money over four years. For further information, send an email to Info@thrcollegeplanning.com or call 1-855-847-4723 (THR GRAD).

Also, could you image the irate attitudes if the teams only included freshmen or walk-ons?

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Topics: STUDENT