How Questionnaires Can Help You Get Recruited

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Many student-athletes miss opportunities to play their sport in college simply because they don't complete the questionnaires they receive from coaches. Say you receive 30 questionnaires a week. What's the likelihood you will fill them all out—by hand? You probably won't, which is where the problems start.

Athletes become selective and send questionnaires back only to the schools they like—then they often sit and wait. Because the number of positions and spots is limited at each school, your chances of playing may be eliminated if the school of your choice has already filled your position.

For example, if you only fill out the questionnaire for the Big Ten school you're interested in and leave all the MAC school questionnaires blank, you may miss out on an opportunity. The Big Ten school could sign a higher-rated recruit at your position, which means you won't get an offer there. Furthermore, the MAC school that has a scholarship available at your position won't make you an offer, because you didn't fill out their questionnaire—leaving you with nowhere to play. The point is that you need to complete and return every questionnaire you get, because you don't always get to pick your school. The school picks you.

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Many student-athletes miss opportunities to play their sport in college simply because they don't complete the questionnaires they receive from coaches. Say you receive 30 questionnaires a week. What's the likelihood you will fill them all out—by hand? You probably won't, which is where the problems start.

Athletes become selective and send questionnaires back only to the schools they like—then they often sit and wait. Because the number of positions and spots is limited at each school, your chances of playing may be eliminated if the school of your choice has already filled your position.

For example, if you only fill out the questionnaire for the Big Ten school you're interested in and leave all the MAC school questionnaires blank, you may miss out on an opportunity. The Big Ten school could sign a higher-rated recruit at your position, which means you won't get an offer there. Furthermore, the MAC school that has a scholarship available at your position won't make you an offer, because you didn't fill out their questionnaire—leaving you with nowhere to play. The point is that you need to complete and return every questionnaire you get, because you don't always get to pick your school. The school picks you.

Top tier recruits, depending on the sport, receive anywhere from 40 to 300 letters and questionnaires from colleges. Many college coaches like it when an athlete fills out their form by hand, because it demonstrates the athlete's interest in their program. If you don't have time to fill out every form by hand, make a student-athlete profile sheet that answers what's typically asked of you on traditional forms, and staple it to each questionnaire when you send it back. Include your name, address, phone number, coaches' names, height, weight, position, etc. This way, you keep all your options open. Besides showing the coach that you're interested, the profile sheet also says, "Look, I'm being contacted by 50 to 60 schools. You're not the only school interested in me."

Include in your student-athlete profile:

Contact Info
Name
Address
Phone number
Email address
Date of birth
Parents' names

Athletic Info
Position
Awards and accomplishments
Key stats
Height
Weight
Jersey #
Coaches' names

Academic Info
GPA
Class Rank
ACT/SAT/SATII
Academic awards
Extracurricular activities
High school name
Enrollment


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Topics: COACH | STUDENT