No Tuna in Subway's Tuna Sandwiches, Lawsuit Claims

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Subway is facing another lawsuit over its ingredients, alleging that the tuna salad used in its sandwiches and wraps contains absolutely no tuna.

A representative of Subway emailed The Washing Post said the claims are without merit. Not only is its tuna the real deal, the company says, but it's wild-caught, too.

Shalini Dogra, one of the plaintiffs' attorneys, declined to say exactly what ingredients the lab tests revealed. But based on independent lab tests of "multiple samples" taken from Subway locations in California, the "tuna" is "a mixture of various concoctions that do not constitute tuna, yet have been blended together by defendants to imitate the appearance of tuna." They found that the ingredients were not tuna and not fish.

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Subway is facing another lawsuit over its ingredients, alleging that the tuna salad used in its sandwiches and wraps contains absolutely no tuna.

A representative of Subway emailed The Washing Post said the claims are without merit. Not only is its tuna the real deal, the company says, but it's wild-caught, too.

Shalini Dogra, one of the plaintiffs' attorneys, declined to say exactly what ingredients the lab tests revealed. But based on independent lab tests of "multiple samples" taken from Subway locations in California, the "tuna" is "a mixture of various concoctions that do not constitute tuna, yet have been blended together by defendants to imitate the appearance of tuna." They found that the ingredients were not tuna and not fish.

According to Subway's nutritional information page on its website, the tuna salad contains flaked tuna in brine, mayonnaise and an additive to "protect flavor."

Over the years, Subway, has been a frequent target for lawsuits, some more serious than others.

2020 - Ireland's Supreme Court ruled that their was too much sugar in its sandwiches for it to be considered "bread."

2017 - The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's (CBC) Marketplace program DNA-tested pieces of chicken. Subway's oven-roasted chicken contained 53.6 percent chicken DNA, and its chicken strips were only 42.8 percent chicken.

2013 - Class-action complaint accused the chain of selling $5 foot-long sandwiches that were only 11 to 11½ inches long.

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Topics: NUTRITION | SUBWAY | FAST FOOD