Boost Your Game With Psychology Tips From the Philadelphia Phillies

Learn sports psychology tips the Philadelphia Phillies used to improve their performance this year.

I'd like to dub this frustrating season for the Philadelphia Phillies a "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" year. If you follow baseball, you've noted that the Phillies have been off-and-on all year, going from a top team, one that had won five National League East titles, to a third-place squad struggling to reach .500. However, recently they've begun to show some of their former brilliance.

Here are two key elements the Phillies used that can help you improve your performance.

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I'd like to dub this frustrating season for the Philadelphia Phillies a "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" year. If you follow baseball, you've noted that the Phillies have been off-and-on all year, going from a top team, one that had won five National League East titles, to a third-place squad struggling to reach .500. However, recently they've begun to show some of their former brilliance.

Here are two key elements the Phillies used that can help you improve your performance.

Eliminate the fear of choking

The Phillies decided not to choke. When you watched them play, they showed confidence, something that had been missing in previous outings. The fear of choking could not be seen when you looked in their eyes. It was replaced with a gleam of excitement.

Fear can be crippling to any athlete, on both offense and defense. Even scarier is that it can spread through a team like the plague. Rewire those thoughts. If they start out in the area of fear and choking, reconnect them to positive production. Most performance experts attempt to create new neural pathways in an athlete, which can help them achieve the results they want. In this case, we connected them to produce more hits and throw more strikes.

Eliminate doubt

This season, the Phillies have been riddled with doubt, internally and externally, and it has impaired their ability to play as a team. Doubt causes a player to question his ability, which means his head cannot be centered on letting go and playing good ball.

A baseball player we recently worked with wanted to get ready for tryouts in front of pro scouts. But he had a nagging doubt. It was like a cloud that followed him around. He never knew when it was going to overtake him. When the doubt cloud hit, his batting production went down, he made errors in the field, and his chances of being picked up were diminished. When we helped him turn the doubt cloud into a cloud of thankfulness, happiness and fun, everything changed. He was thankful for his ability to play at a high level. He realized the happiness he felt just by being able to play baseball, and he appreciated the opportunities that were before him. And most of all, he remembered that the game is supposed to be fun. With this new cloud, he was able to blow away the doubt, step up and impress the scouts.

See how Steve Nash dealt with doubters.


Photo Credit: Getty Images // Thinkstock

Topics: HAPPINESS