Prevent tired legs with Oklahoma State basketball

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Heavy legs often result from low energy levels. Proper nutrition can prevent this by promoting recovery for your entire body. Make sure to replenish your muscle glycogen stores by fueling your body with carbs 10 to 15 minutes after workouts. The electrolyte drinks work great for this, because they are filled with carbs.

Properly cooling down and stretching post-workout can also keep your legs fresh for games. Overlooking either element before competition can make your legs feel tired.

If your legs do feel heavy on a game day, try contrast baths followed by a nice stretch. Get in a cold tub for about 30-45 seconds, then get in the hot tub for 90 seconds to two minutes. Repeat this cycle three times, two and a half hours before your game, making sure to end with the hot tub. The cold water causes everything to shrink, and the hot water opens it back up. Together, they really get your blood pumping. Make sure to keep your time in the hot tub short, so you don't relax too much. You want to be on edge and ready to react during competition.

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By Murphy Grant

Heavy legs often result from low energy levels. Proper nutrition can prevent this by promoting recovery for your entire body. Make sure to replenish your muscle glycogen stores by fueling your body with carbs 10 to 15 minutes after workouts. The electrolyte drinks work great for this, because they are filled with carbs.

Properly cooling down and stretching post-workout can also keep your legs fresh for games. Overlooking either element before competition can make your legs feel tired.

If your legs do feel heavy on a game day, try contrast baths followed by a nice stretch. Get in a cold tub for about 30-45 seconds, then get in the hot tub for 90 seconds to two minutes. Repeat this cycle three times, two and a half hours before your game, making sure to end with the hot tub. The cold water causes everything to shrink, and the hot water opens it back up. Together, they really get your blood pumping. Make sure to keep your time in the hot tub short, so you don't relax too much. You want to be on edge and ready to react during competition.

— Murphy Grant, former strength and conditioning coach at Oklahoma State University, recently became the head athletic trainer for Kansas University's football team.


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