Use the Athlete's 30-Day Challenge to Track Your Fitness Progress

Use these exercises to measure your fitness progress during a 30-day challenge.

A 30-day challenge is a great way for athletes to measure their progress. From full workouts to finishers to diets, challenges abound for seemingly every situation. The following challenge uses different exercises, and athletes should perform it every day for a month. It can be done as a standalone workout, but I prefer to use it as a finisher at the end of my regular workouts. On off days, this can be the only thing you do. To avoid burnout, there are four different finishers.

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A 30-day challenge is a great way for athletes to measure their progress. From full workouts to finishers to diets, challenges abound for seemingly every situation. The following challenge uses different exercises, and athletes should perform it every day for a month. It can be done as a standalone workout, but I prefer to use it as a finisher at the end of my regular workouts. On off days, this can be the only thing you do. To avoid burnout, there are four different finishers.

Push-Ups

Push-Ups

Push-Ups are one of the most basic exercises a person can do. Push-Ups work the pectoral region of the body. A true upper-body exercise, Push-Ups also target the triceps and the shoulders, while also providing a great stabilizing challenge for the core. This gym class staple still has a place in even the most serious workout plans.

Perform 100 of them, using as many sets as you need.

RELATED: 15 Advanced Push-Up Variations

Squats

Squats

If Push-Ups are one of the most popular exercises for the upper body, Squats are the same for the lower body. You only need to use your body weight. Lock your arms behind your head and lower your body until your hips are parallel to the ground. The key is to lower yourself slowly while keeping your knees in line with your toes.

Perform 100, using as many sets as needed.

RELATED: Front Squat vs. Back Squat: What's the Better Choice for Athletes

Pull-Ups

Pull-Ups

Pull-Ups challenge even the best conditioned athletes. When you use an overhand grip, Pull-Ups work your back, arms and shoulders all in one move. Start in a dead hang and pull yourself up until your chin is above the bar and your chest is almost touching it, then lower yourself to the starting position. Keep your body from swinging or moving during the exercise.

Since Pull-Ups can be difficult, perform only 10, using perfect form.

RELATED: How To Do More Pull-Ups and Build a Stronger Back 

One-Mile Run

One-Mile Run

The one-mile run is a great aerobic exercise to cap off any workout. Start at a brisk pace, one you can maintain throughout the entire run. After your initial run, set a goal to aim for on each subsequent run. Your runs don't have to be all-out sprints, but you should move at more than a leisurely pace.

RELATED: Try These Three Sprint Drills to Run a Faster Mile

This 30-day challenge is a great way to measure your progress. Take before and after photos to give yourself visual evidence. After 30 days, you will be in better shape and ready for the next challenge.


Photo Credit: Getty Images // Thinkstock

Topics: SQUAT | PULL-UP | PUSH-UP | WORKOUTS | EXERCISE | SPRINT