Captain America Still Struggles to Conform in 'Winter Soldier'

Captain America learns to become a modern-day hero in the upcoming film, 'The Winter Soldier.' Watch the trailer on STACK Gamer.

During a recent on-set interview with journalists, Chris Evans, who portrays Marvel's Captain America, revealed that things haven't gotten any easier for the Cap since Avengers. He still has trouble finding his moral compass. In the upcoming movie The Winter Soldier, he struggles to find the delicate balance between right and wrong by modern society's definition.

Evans said, "This movie, it's about him not just trying to acclimate to the modern world, but it's always been Cap's goal to do what's right and to be of service, to help where he can. I think the question is, well, what is right? I think it was a lot easier in the 40s to know who the evil was. There's no disputing Nazis are bad. [But] now, it becomes a little bit more of a difficult answer. There's a lot more of a grey area. That's where it becomes a tricky dispute for Cap, because things were just done differently in the 40s."

Society's conventions aside, the Cap's alter ego Steve Rogers grapples with guilt over Bucky Barnes becoming the Winter Solider. "This was one of his biggest sources of guilt, the fact that out of his whole crew of howling commandos, these guys that he convinced to come into battle with him, it was one guy that didn't make it back," Evans said. "And it was the one guy that was always there for him. And then to find out that he did make it and was subjected to some of the things he was subjected to, that's a lot. That's a lot for Steve to process, and he takes full responsibility for it, because he wouldn't do it any other way."

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During a recent on-set interview with journalists, Chris Evans, who portrays Marvel's Captain America, revealed that things haven't gotten any easier for the Cap since Avengers. He still has trouble finding his moral compass. In the upcoming movie The Winter Soldier, he struggles to find the delicate balance between right and wrong by modern society's definition.

Evans said, "This movie, it's about him not just trying to acclimate to the modern world, but it's always been Cap's goal to do what's right and to be of service, to help where he can. I think the question is, well, what is right? I think it was a lot easier in the 40s to know who the evil was. There's no disputing Nazis are bad. [But] now, it becomes a little bit more of a difficult answer. There's a lot more of a grey area. That's where it becomes a tricky dispute for Cap, because things were just done differently in the 40s."

Society's conventions aside, the Cap's alter ego Steve Rogers grapples with guilt over Bucky Barnes becoming the Winter Solider. "This was one of his biggest sources of guilt, the fact that out of his whole crew of howling commandos, these guys that he convinced to come into battle with him, it was one guy that didn't make it back," Evans said. "And it was the one guy that was always there for him. And then to find out that he did make it and was subjected to some of the things he was subjected to, that's a lot. That's a lot for Steve to process, and he takes full responsibility for it, because he wouldn't do it any other way."

Captain America: the Winter Solider, which takes place about two years after the events in The Avengers, will open April 4, starring Scarlett Johansson, Sebastian Stan, Anthony Mackie, Emily VanCamp, Hayley Atwell and Robert Redford.


Photo Credit: Getty Images // Thinkstock