Concussion-Prevention Shockstrip Approved for High School Football

The concussion-preventing Shockstrip device has been approved by the NFHSA for use in high school football. Learn more about the Shockstrip.

There are few worse sounds in football than the crash of a helmet-to-helmet hit. In his 16 years as a chiropractic physician, Dr. Steven Novicky has treated hundreds of football players suffering from the long-term effects of concussions.

As the years went on, Novicky grew more and more concerned about the escalating number of concussed athletes coming into his office. His concern prompted him to create the Shockstrip, a pad that attaches to the external shell of any helmet. The Shockstrip has been shown to reduce the risk of minor brain injuries and concussions, decrease the stress placed on the cervical spine, and dampen the "cracking" sound of a helmet-to-helmet hit to lessen the number of reports of hearing problems and headaches.

Shockstrips

The Shockstrip in action

Shockstrip debuted in the 2011 season, when 110 Ohio high school athletes (four of which were high-risk from previous concussions) who wore the helmet pads reported no concussions.

Now, the Shockstrip could be coming to your high school football team.

The findings of the 2011 experiment prompted the National Federation of High School Associations to allow the use of Shockstrips nationwide. This is the first time the NFHSA has sanctioned an exterior enhancement for use in gameplay.

Learn more about Shockstrip and find out how your school can order it here.

Check out these other STACK articles on concussions:

STACK Concussion Awareness and Prevention Series
Perform These Exercises To Prevent a Concussion
Head Injuries Are Dangerous Even If They Don't Cause a Concussion


Photo Credit: Getty Images // Thinkstock

Topics: FOOTBALL | CONCUSSION | GAMEPLAY | STRESS | PHYSICIAN | SPINE | HELMET | FOOTBALL PLAYERS | HEARING | HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL | CONCUSSION AWARENESS