Ohio State Fans Created the Equivalent of a 5.79 Earthquake When the Buckeyes Beat Michigan in Double OT

There was a whole lot of quaking' going on.

With 110,045 fans packed into Ohio Stadium to watch the Ohio State Buckeyes down the Michigan Wolverines in a double-overtime thriller, it wasn't hard to guess that the scarlet and gray faithful would bring the ruckus. Geologists had the same notion.

To appropriately measure the noise level inside the Shoe, sensors were placed around the stadium to measure seismic activity and turn it into a "FanQuake" rating, a joint project between Ohio State, Miami of Ohio and the Ohio Department of Natural Resources. Per cleveland.com, "the scale converts shaking into the perceived magnitude of a naturally occurring earthquake, if one were to occur centered 10 kilometers (about 6.2 miles) below ground underneath the stadium."

RELATED: The 7 Loudest College Football Stadiums, Ranked

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With 110,045 fans packed into Ohio Stadium to watch the Ohio State Buckeyes down the Michigan Wolverines in a double-overtime thriller, it wasn't hard to guess that the scarlet and gray faithful would bring the ruckus. Geologists had the same notion.

To appropriately measure the noise level inside the Shoe, sensors were placed around the stadium to measure seismic activity and turn it into a "FanQuake" rating, a joint project between Ohio State, Miami of Ohio and the Ohio Department of Natural Resources. Per cleveland.com, "the scale converts shaking into the perceived magnitude of a naturally occurring earthquake, if one were to occur centered 10 kilometers (about 6.2 miles) below ground underneath the stadium."

RELATED: The 7 Loudest College Football Stadiums, Ranked

The opening kickoff was rowdy enough, registering a 5.27 on the FanQuake scale, but the top pretty much got blown off the place when Curtis Samuel scored the game-winning touchdown in the second overtime to give the Buckeyes a huge win over their bitter rivals. That play resulted in fans losing their minds to the tune of a 5.79 magnitude earthquake.

Measuring noise level at various stadiums around the country has become the new chic, with places like CenturyLink Field in Seattle and Arrowhead Stadium in Kansas City leading the pack in terms of decibel levels. Ohio Stadium can't be far behind.

 


Photo Credit: Getty Images // Thinkstock

Topics: NEWS | UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN | OHIO STATE BUCKEYES | FANQUAKE | NOISE | BIG TEN