One-Time with the Pioneers

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Your coach always says scoring a goal doesn't have to be pretty. There's something sweet, though, about burying a one-time shot into the back of the net.

Whether you're running the point on the power play or crossing the ice with a pass for your defensive partner, follow along as University of Denver assistant hockey coach Steve Miller breaks down how to get off a one-time shot.

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Your coach always says scoring a goal doesn't have to be pretty. There's something sweet, though, about burying a one-time shot into the back of the net.

Whether you're running the point on the power play or crossing the ice with a pass for your defensive partner, follow along as University of Denver assistant hockey coach Steve Miller breaks down how to get off a one-time shot.

The Setup
You want to get your momentum going backward away from the passer, but not too far or else you'll take yourself away from a good shooting angle. Turn your hips to get open to where the pass is coming from so you'll have momentum going backward.

The Pass
If you have to zing the puck to a guy who's open for a one-timer on the backside, it's got to be a quick pass or it'll never get through. A defenseman on the point may have more flexibility if the pass doesn't have much steam. It's got to have a little bit of mustard on it. If you just float it over to him on the point, the defender might have a chance to get into that lane.

The Wheelhouse
Some guys like to receive the pass off their back foot, while others like it between their legs. The most constant wheelhouse is between the player's feet.

The Shot
The key with your stick is to have it under control. You don't want too big of a backswing; keep it between your hips and shoulders. When you start coming back, get your hips through it and finish with a good follow through toward the net.

Puck Placement
With the one-timer, you want to hit the net. You're forcing the goalie to make a save on a shot that's a difficult play for him. He's got to move side to side and then be ready to stop the puck.

For more training tips from the pros, check out the Hockey Channel on STACK TV.


Photo Credit: Getty Images // Thinkstock

Topics: HOCKEY | COACH