How to Build Your Own Baseball Workout | STACK

Eric Bunnell
- Eric Bunnell has coached college baseball for nearly a decade. He currently works with infielders, catchers and base runners at Lake Erie College in Painesville,...

How to Construct a Baseball Workout

December 3, 2012 | Eric Bunnell

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Over the years, baseball strength training has evolved toward greater emphasis on functional training. The days of going to the gym to max out on the Bench Press are gone. The best exercises are mainly ground-based, so that you train like you play—on your feet.

Below you will find a formula and guidelines on how to construct your baseball workouts.

Explosive Exercises

Explosive exercises, like Olympic lifts, are absolutely critical for baseball players. They develop fast-twitch muscle fibers, which are responsible for maximum efforts of power when hitting or throwing. Focus on proper form and do not overload the exercise.

Choose 1: 3-4x6-8

Lower-Body Exercises

Every skill in baseball starts from the ground up. So lower-body exercises are critical if you want to add hitting power or velocity to your throws.

Choose 2: 3-4x6-8

Rotational Core Exercises

The main skills in baseball are highly rotational. Med ball exercises that closely mimic the rotational moves performed when hitting and throwing should be the focus of your core training.

Choose 2: 3x10-12

Hip Exercises

Hips are often the most neglected area in baseball strength training. The most powerful muscle group in the body, the hips are the gateway between the lower and upper body. If you ignore them, your hard work on other areas of the body will be negated.

Choose 2: 3x8

Upper-Body Exercises

While most athletes make their upper bodies a major focus, this is actually the last piece of the puzzle. The major goals for upper-body training are to develop strength for power transfer from the rest of the body, and to limit the risk of injury. For baseball players, it's better to stick to bodyweight exercises than to lift heavy weight.

Choose 2: 3x10

Eric Bunnell
- Eric Bunnell has coached college baseball for nearly a decade. He currently works with infielders, catchers and base runners at Lake Erie College in Painesville,...